How to Get Pre-Approved for a discover it secured credit card?

Have you been thinking about getting a discover it secured credit card? If so, you may be wondering how to get pre-approved. There are two easy ways to see if you pre-qualify for a D

iscover credit card. You can either use their free online tool, or you could receive a pre-approved offer in the mail.

Keep reading to learn more about how to qualify for Discover pre-approval.


What is Pre-Approval?

Pre-approval means that a lender has looked at your credit report and other financial information and decided that you are likely to be approved for a loan or credit card. This is different from pre-qualification, which only uses basic information (usually just your income) to give you an idea of what you might be able to borrow or a credit card to be approved.

With pre-approval, the lender will pull your credit report and look at your credit history, employment history, and other factors before making a decision.

This is why pre-approval is often seen as more valuable than pre-qualification; it gives you a better idea of what terms (interest rate, credit limit, etc.) you might get approved for.

>>Read More: The Best Pre-Approved Credit Cards Of 2022


How Discover Credit Card pre-approval works:

Step 1: You receive an offer.

The first step is simple: you receive an offer from Discover. This could come in the form of an email, a letter in the mail, or even an ad on TV or radio. Once you have your offer, it’s time to move on to step two.

Step 2: Fill out an application for discover it® secured credit card

If you received your offer by mail, there will be an application included that you can fill out and send back to Discover. If you received your offer online or over the phone, you’ll need to enter your invitation number at discover.com/applynow.

To apply for the Discover it® Secured credit card, simply fill out the online application form. Some personal data that you’ll need to input are things like your full name, where you live, and your social security number. You will also need to fill in some financial details such as how much you earn and what sort of expenses you have.

Once you have submitted the application, you will receive a decision within a few days. If you are approved, you will be able to start using your new credit card right away.

Step 3: Discover evaluates you.

After you’ve submitted your application, Discover will take a look at your information and decide whether or not to approve you for the card. In most cases, applicants are approved; however, it’s possible that you could be denied after a more thorough review of your information.

If you’re interested in getting a Discover card, the process is relatively simple. Just follow these three steps and you’ll be well on your way to being approved!


A Few Tips to Improve Your Chances of Qualifying

Check if You Opted Out:

If you previously opted out of receiving prescreened offers from lenders—which you can do by calling 1-(888)-567-8688—then Discover will not send you offers in the mail or allow you to check online which products you qualify for.

So if you don’t remember opting out but still don’t receive offers from Discover (or other lenders), it might be worth giving them a call just in case.

Confirm Your Address is Correct:

This one seems pretty self-explanatory, but it bears repeating: if your address is wrong, Discover won’t be able to send you offers! Make sure all your personal information is up to date so that when an offer comes along, it doesn’t get lost in the shuffle.

Improve Your Credit Score/History:

Obviously, the better your credit score is, the more likely it is that any lender—including Discover—will approve your application. If your score isn’t where you want it to be or if there are any negative marks on your report (late payments, collections accounts), now is the time to start working on fixing those things.

The higher your score/the better your history when Discover pulls your report during the approval process, the better chance you have of getting approved for their products.

Pay Down Debt:

This goes hand in hand with improving your credit score/history; paying down debt lowers your debt-to-income ratio (DTI), which is one-factor lenders look at when considering loan/credit card applications.

A lower DTI means less risk for the lender—and that usually results in a higher chance of approval (and sometimes even better terms). So even if it takes some time and effort to pay off those balances, it could pay off in the long run!


Conclusion:

If receiving mail from potential lenders makes you anxious instead of excited, then pre-approval might not be right for everyone.

However, if being prepared for every eventuality sounds like something that would appeal to you—or if simply knowing ahead of time whether or not your credit card will be accepted would put your mind at ease—then getting pre-approved for a Discover card (or any other type of credit card) could be worth considering!

Have you ever been pre-approved for a credit card? How did it work out for you? Let us know in the comments below!

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