Canceling a Credit Card: Does It Hurt Your Credit?

There comes a time in everyone’s life when they have to Canceling a Credit Card. Maybe you’ve moved and don’t need the card anymore, or ma

ybe you’re consolidating your debt and don’t want to have multiple cards. Whatever the reason, canceling a credit card is not a decision that should be taken lightly.

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In this blog post, we’ll discuss the implications of canceling a credit card on your credit score. We’ll also provide some tips on how to cancel your card without damaging your credit score!

Let’s start.

Canceling a Credit Card Does It Hurt Your Credit
Canceling a Credit Card Does It Hurt Your Credit

Introduction

Many people believe that canceling a credit card will automatically hurt their credit score, but this is not always the case. There are a few valid reasons for deciding to close an account, and if done correctly, canceling a credit card can have a minimal impact on your score.

Some valid reasons for closing a credit card account include…

  • No longer using the card,
  • Wanting to avoid annual fees, or
  • Trying to simplify your finances.

If you decide to cancel a credit card, the first step is to notify the issuer in writing of your decision. Once you have done this, you can safely destroy the physical card.

However, if you decide to keep the account open, make sure to cut up the physical card so you do not accidentally use it in the future.

By taking these steps, you can cancel a credit card without damaging your credit score.

How Credit Score is calculated

A credit score is a number that represents the risk level of a borrower. Lenders use credit scores to determine whether or not to approve a loan and what interest rate to charge.

The higher the credit score, the lower the risk, and the lower the interest rate.

Credit scores are calculated using a variety of factors, including payment history, credit utilization, length of credit history, and types of credit accounts.

  • Payment history is the most important factor in calculating a credit score. It accounts for 35% of the score.
  • Credit utilization, or how much of your available credit you’re using, is also a significant factor, accounting for 30% of the score.
  • Length of credit history (15%), and
  • Types of credit accounts (10%) are also used to calculate credit scores.

Scores range from 300 to 850, with scores above 700 considered good or excellent. A good credit score can make it easier to qualify for loans and get better terms and rates.

A bad or fair credit score can make it more difficult to qualify for loans and result in higher interest rates. Improving your credit score generally takes time but there are some things you can do to improve your score more quickly, such as paying down debt and maintaining a good payment history.

When should you close a credit card?

A credit card can be a helpful financial tool, but it can also be a source of stress and debt. If you’re struggling to keep up with your credit card payments, you may be considering canceling your card. But is that the best decision?

Here are a few things to consider before you cancel your credit card.

  • First, can you afford to pay off your balance in full? If not, canceling your card could leave you with a large amount of debt. And if you have a good payment history with your card issuer, they may be willing to work with you to develop a payment plan that works for both of you.
  • Second, what will happen to your credit score if you cancel your card? If you have a good credit history, canceling your card could cause your score to drop. And that could make it difficult to qualify for loans in the future.
  • High Annual Fees: If you’re paying a high annual fee for your credit card, it may make sense to cancel the card and find one with no annual fee. You can also try negotiating with your credit card issuer to lower your annual fee. Many issuers are willing to work with their customers to keep them as long-term customers.
  • Separation or Divorce: If you’re going through a separation or divorce, you may want to cancel joint credit card accounts. This can help to protect your credit score from any late payments your ex-spouse may make. In general, it’s best to avoid closing a credit card unless you have a good reason to do so.
  • Finally, are there any other options available to you? If you’re struggling to make payments, you may be able to lower your interest rate or negotiate a hardship plan with your card issuer. Before you cancel your card, be sure to explore all of your options.

Canceling a credit card can be a difficult decision, but it’s important to weigh all of your options before you make a decision.

Consider your financial situation, your credit score, and your long-term goals before you cancel your card. And be sure to contact your card issuer to discuss your options. They may be able to help you keep your account open and avoid damaging your credit score.

Does canceling a credit card have an impact on your credit score?

Most people know that canceling a credit card can have an impact on your credit score. But what they don’t realize is that several different factors can come into play when you cancel a credit card.

Let’s take a look at some of the things that can affect your credit score when you cancel a credit card.

Credit utilization ratio

One factor that can affect your credit score is your credit utilization ratio. This is the ratio of your outstanding credit card balances to your total available credit. If you cancel a credit card, you’re essentially reducing your available credit, which can increase your credit utilization ratio and lower your score.

Length of your credit history

Another factor that can come into play is the length of your credit history. When you cancel a credit card, you’re also losing the history associated with that account. This can shorten your overall length of credit history, which can also hurt your score.

Giving up valuable points or miles

And finally, if you cancel a rewards credit card, you could be giving up valuable points or miles. While this may not have a direct impact on your score, it could affect your bottom line if you’re someone who relies on rewards to help offset the costs of travel or other expenses.


When Canceling a Card does not make sense

There are a few reasons you might want to cancel a credit card. Maybe you’re tired of dealing with the annual fees, or maybe you’ve found a better card to use. But canceling a credit card is not always the best idea.

Here are four times when canceling a card might not make sense:

  • You have a balance on the card.
  • You’ve had the card for a short time.
  • It’s your only credit card.
  • You have a good history with the card issuer.
  • Your Credit limit is substantially reduced.
  • It lowers the number of credit factors in your credit mix.

If you’re thinking about canceling a credit card, make sure it makes sense for your situation. Otherwise, you might end up doing more harm than good.


10 Steps Cancel Your Credit Card

When you are certain you want to close your credit card, follow these nine steps to help ensure the process is as smooth as possible.

1. Contact your credit card issuer to discuss your options.

If you’re struggling to make payments, you may be able to lower your interest rate or negotiate a hardship plan with your card issuer.

Before you cancel your card, be sure to explore all of your options.Your credit card issuer may be able to help you keep your account open and avoid damaging your credit score.

Before you cancel a credit card, call the customer service number on the back of your card and speak with a representative about your decision. They can help walk you through the process and answer any questions you might have.

Be sure to have the following information handy when you call: – Your account number – The date you want the account closed – A brief explanation of your decision to close the account.

2. Ask about hardship plans or reduced interest rates.

If you’re having trouble making your payments, ask about hardship plans or reduced interest rates. Your card issuer may be willing to work with you to help you keep your account open.

It’s important to remember that closing your account is not the only option if you’re having financial difficulties.

3. Explore all of your options before making a decision.

Before you cancel your card, be sure to explore all of your options. There may be a way for you to keep your account open and avoid damaging your credit score. Your credit card issuer may be able to help you with a hardship plan or reduced interest rate.

4. Consider your financial situation and goals before canceling the card.

Canceling your card, be sure to consider your financial situation and goals. Canceling a credit card can hurt your credit score, so it’s important to weigh the pros and cons before making a decision.. Make a list of your remaining debts and their interest rates.

5. Pay off any remaining balance on the card.

If you have a balance remaining on your credit card, be sure to pay it off before you close the account. You can do this by making a payment online or over the phone. If you have a balance remaining on your credit card, make a payment online or over the phone to pay it off before you close the account.

You may also want to consider transferring your balance to another credit card with a lower interest rate. This can help you save money on interest and speed up the process of paying off your debt.

6. Redeem any rewards you’ve earned.

If you have a rewards credit card, be sure to redeem any rewards you’ve earned before you cancel the account. You can typically do this by logging into your account online or by calling customer service.

Rewards credit cards often have strict rules about how and when you can redeem your points, so be sure to read the fine print before closing your account.

Some rewards programs may also require you to keep your account open for a certain period in order to redeem your points, so be sure to check the terms and conditions of your program before canceling.

If you’re not able to redeem your rewards before closing your account, you may want to consider transferring them to another rewards program.

7. Send a letter of cancellation.

Once you’ve decided to close your account, you’ll need to send a letter of cancellation to your credit card issuer. This can be done by mail or online.

When sending your letter of cancellation, be sure to include the following information:

  • Your name and address
  • Your account number
  • The date you want the account closed
  • A brief explanation of your decision to close the account.

You should also keep a copy of the letter for your records. Sending a letter is not required, but it may help prevent future charges from being made on your account.

It may take a few days for your issuer to process your request, so be sure to check back frequently until you see that the account has been closed..

8. Ask them to send you a written confirmation of the cancellation.

After you’ve sent your letter of cancellation, be sure to ask your issuer for a written confirmation of the cancellation. This can help prevent future charges from being made on your account.

It may take a few days for your issuer to process your request, so be sure to check back frequently until you see that the account has been closed.

9. Have your credit report reviewed.

Once your account has been closed, you’ll want to have your credit report reviewed. This can help you identify any errors or negative information that may be appearing on your report.

If you see anything on your report that doesn’t look right, be sure to dispute it with the credit bureau. You can get a free copy of your credit report from Credit Karma or another Free Credit provider.

10. and Destroy your old card.

After your account has been closed, be sure to cut up your old credit card and destroy it. This can help prevent future charges from being made on your account.

You may also want to consider shredding the card or cutting it into small pieces to prevent someone from using your information fraudulently.


The Bottom Line

So, should you close that credit card account? The answer is maybe – but it’s not as simple as just shutting the door on a card. If you have a good reason to close an account, go ahead and do so.

But remember, canceling a credit card can damage your credit score if done without care. And if closing cards isn’t necessary, try to reduce any other balances before taking this step.

At the end of the day, managing your credit cards responsibly is key to maintaining a healthy financial picture – something we can all appreciate.

How many credit cards do you have? Do you think having multiple cards affects your credit score? Let us know in the comments!

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